Tag Archives: Legal System

Innovation: Do you initiate or are you dragged?

Marketers would have us believe that ever year every new product is an “innovation”. Consequently, it is an overused word, but when I talk about it I am referring to the changes in the way products and services are delivered to customers to better meet their actual needs.

In this sense of the word, every market has a degree of innovation present at all times. However, what marks some markets out is the rate of innovation. This rate is often driven by external forces rather than internal. Hoover did not start making bag-less cleaners after 70 years of a tried and trusted formula for fun, but because an inventor new to the cleaner industry, James Dyson, threatened their supremacy.

However, the greatest changes usually occur because of government intervention, a change in law or a government initiative. The success of the AT&T breakup initiated by the US Govt is controversial, but it created a very competitive market, at least initially. Ferrari (and the rest of the car industry) is very reluctantly currently working on clean technologies because of pending EU regulations, rather than some deep-seated environmental belief. The sale by the US Govt of old media airwaves will facilitate an explosion in wireless communications although it was heavily opposed by the old media.

It is inevitable that industries which have invested heavily in the status quo will not look to innovate unless pushed to do so.

So how is innovation in the legal market?

There has been change in the market in terms of attitudes and the introduction of some technology, but at the moment the rate of innovation is generally low. In a profession that places weight on precedent there seems little reason for change. However, legal precedent has little to do with law firms. The law does not belong to the firms and arguably is not the product of the firms either.

Should a new external force come into play in the legal market, innovation will result. The intended Legal Services Board deregulation, inspired by the Clementi Report, looks like that external force.

Are you ready for the resulting innovation?

BigWig will explore the likely challenges this will create and look at the potential solutions.

Liam Wall
Founder
BigWig Legal Network
www.bigwignetwork.co.uk

What is BigWig Legal Network?
The deregulation of UK legal structures will have a huge impact on how Law is practised and new legal services are offered. BigWig Legal Network is the UK’s first membership development organisation for fee earners in legal practices, priced for membership affordability, which will offer what legal professionals desire most of all: Accurate, dependable new insights and techniques for developing the legal services of the future.

Find out more at our monthly meetings.

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An alternative take on “Tesco Law”

While not a new phrase for someone like me to bandy around, I wonder what you think Clementi meant by it?

Well, some suggest he meant the work of existing law firms being commoditised and sold off the shelf at Tesco, as Tesco do with banking, insurance and mobile phone services.

But what if he simply meant no change to the service itself, but a lot of change to the availability of the service?

Time-wise, Tesco open from early till late, certainly 7 days a week. Some stores open 24 hours at certain times of the year. When I worked for two large, successful, entrepreneurial, corporate companies, as Head of Finance, I was on the job from early till late, 7 days a week and on certain deals nearly 24 hours at a stretch. Now, with my corporate days behind me, my life revolves around clients during usual business hours and around usual pre-school and post-school hours with my family. In both situations, f I were looking for legal advice, 9pm in the evening would be ideal.

And with regard to location, in most conurbations in the UK, you are probably never more than 15 to 20 minutes away from a Tesco store, many of which have parking and a bus service.

So maybe Clementi was not talking about the devaluing of legal advice into some low-level commodity, but simply about making the existing provision available at a time and place to suit the customer. And even if he wasn’t, why not think about it?!


Liam Wall
Founder
BigWig Legal Network
www.bigwignetwork.co.uk

What is BigWig Legal Network?
The deregulation of UK legal structures will have a huge impact on how Law is practised and new legal services are offered. BigWig Legal Network is the UK’s first membership development organisation for fee earners in legal practices, priced for membership affordability, which will offer what legal professionals desire most of all: Accurate, dependable new insights and techniques for developing the legal services of the future.

Find out more at our monthly meetings.

Change is Inevitable, Embrace it and Profit

The Clementi Review of 2004 was simply a set of recommendations which did not have the force of law, so many people did not notice it or paid it little attention. The prescient amongst us suspected it meant that legal firms would have to change—whether for the better or the worse depended on one’s point of view. Even though the implementation of the underlying regulations of The Legal Services Act of 2007 was delayed until 2010/11, and may be delayed again, changes are most definitely afoot. What are the implications of the introduction of “Tesco Law” to the UK? Can legal practices afford to ignore it? Continue reading